Department of Physics and Astronomy
666 W. Hancock
Detroit, MI  48201

Physics 1070
Energy and the Environment
Fall Semester 1999

Professor A.M. Saperstein
Room 233 Physics Building
Phone: (313) 577-2733 (577-2721 to leave a message)
E-mail: ams@physics.wayne.edu
Office Hours: MF 11:40 a.m.-12:40 p.m., or by appointment (call and drop in)

Lecture-Discussion 12:50 p.m.-1:45 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday-Room 2025 Science Hall
Lab Sections 12:50 p.m.-2:40 p.m. on Thursday  1:55 p.m.-3:45 p.m. on Wednesday or Friday

Text
Energy (Second Edition), Gordon Aubrecht
Lab materials will be distributed

Questions
How do we “know” our environment-“scientifically” or otherwise?
What is energy?
What are its various forms and how do they relate to each other?
Can we do without it?
Why is understanding it important for effective dealing with our environment?
Where does it come from?
How much is available to us?
Where does it all go to?
Can we improve the dependability of our energy supplies?
What are our responsibilities to our future with respect to energy?

The Class
The class will be run as a combination of lecture and discussion, with emphasis on the latter!  Productive discussion requires that you have read (and thought about!) the appropriate text materials (“LM” for Lab Manual and “H” for Handout) before class.  The discussions are intended to help you understand the text materials and their implications.  If you haven’t read the materials before the class, you won’t be able to participate in the discussion-making for a very dull class!  Also, you will not be able to ask questions appropriately about the reading materials, which you have not understood.  Since the exams will cover both class and text material, it would be wise to participate actively and attentively in all class sessions as well as to do all of the reading carefully.  Besides, discussing this material should be fun and how can you discuss it if you all have not read the same stuff?  “Interactive Question Papers” (IQ’s) to stimulate discussion will be distributed for each class via the class Webpage, as will exam hints and homework answers.

 Coursework
Homework    30%
Laboratory    30%
Two Hourly Exams   30%
Final -Energy Project    10%
Student Energy Project-extra credit 20%
TOTAL    100%

Grades
A  >90%
B  75-90%
C  55-75%
D  35-55%
E  <35%

No Drops Will Be Signed After November

Homework End of chapter “Questions” in Aubrecht text-Graded as G(10), S(5), U(0).  Problems assigned the previous week will be collected every Monday.
 

Course Schedule
Week --Day --Discussion Topic --Text Reading --End of Chapter Assignment -----Lab
1-9/8    W           Introduction        Preface, Ch. 1                                                  Intro., Sci. Meth
            F             Finite World-Finite Resources Ch. 2 -3, 9, 2213, 14, 17, 18, 20, 31 .H-1

2-9/13 M            Work and Energy Ch. 3 -17, 20, 23, 27, 30, 31, 33, 36, 40      Measure & Predict
           W                                                                                                                    Random Events
            F                                                                                                                             LM-2, 17

3-9/20 M            No Class!
           W            Electromagnetism Ch. 4 - 1, 4, 11, 17, 19, 30, 34                        Newton’s Laws
            F                                 Appendix 1  - 11, 13, 14, 15                                                 LM-5

4-9/27 M            Electromagnetism     Ch. 4        - 28, 35, 36                                   Conservation of Energy
           W            Consumption of Electrical Energy Ch. 5 - 16, 17, 19, 30                             LM-7
            F             Production of Electrical Energy     Ch. 6 - 9, 20, 21, 34, 38

5-10/4 M            Chemical Energy        Ch. 7 - 7, 8, 11, 12, 17, 30                        Mechanical Equivalent of Heat
          W              Conservation of Energy  Ch. 8 - 4, 27, 32, 35                                                H-4
          F                                                        Ch. 8 - 37, 38, 43, 44

6-10/11 M            Waste Energy            Ch. 9 - 4, 8, 17, 21, 27                             Electrostatics and Electrical Induction
              W            First Hourly Exam     Chs. 1-9                                                                H-3
              F            Resources                     Ch. 10  - 6, 7, 16, 2

7-10/18 M            Resources                    Ch. 11 - 1, 11, 24, 33, 34                         Current and Voltage
              W            Transportation             Ch. 12 - 1, 12, 13, 16                                                H-2
              F                                                 Ch. 12 - 23, 27, 31

8-10/25 M            Pollution                    Ch.13 - 10, 30, 33, 38                                  Measuring Heat
            W            Climate                        Ch. 14 - 3, 17, 19, 25, 27                                            LM-10
            F                                                 Ch. 15  - 1, 11, 19, 21, 22, 33

9-11/1 M             Nuclear Energy            Ch. 16 - 2, 4, 22, 25, 29, 32                         Heat Transfer
           W                                                  Ch. 17 - 4, 10, 24, 26, 30                                            LM-11
            F                                                    Ch. 18

10-11/8 M                                                Ch. 18 - 1, 31, 33                                         Waves-Ripple Tank
            W            Solar Energy                  Ch. 19                                                                        LM-13

            F                                                    Ch. 19 -  3, 9, 16, 21, 24, 25, 29, 31

11-11/15 M        Solar Energy                    Ch. 20 - 1, 20, 21, 25, 28                            Observing the Sun
            W            Solar Energy                    Ch. 21 -  4, 25                                                        Solar Cells
            F             Agriculture                         Ch. 22 - 3, 10, 20, 21, 27                                         H-5

12-11/22 M        Review                         Chs. 9-22                                                     No Lab
            W            Second Hourly Exam
            F            No Class!  Thanksgiving Break

13-11/29 M        Energy Storage                Ch. 23 - 2, 12, 15, 23, 26                                Atmospheric Testing
            W                                                                                                                                        H-6
            F             Conservation                 Ch. 24 - 1, 11, 23, 25, 29, 31

14-12/6 M            Conservation                                                                                            Radioactive Decay
            W                Recycling                Ch. 25 - 4, 16, 17, 23, 25, 26, 28, 29                            H-7
            F             Recycling

15-12/13 M        Review; Student Projects     Ch. 26 -  4, 8, 16                                         No Lab
            W             Summary
 
 

 Student Energy Projects

Do one of these four projects as your final exam.  Do at most two of the remaining Exercises for Extra Credit .  The written reports (about 5 typewritten pages each) should be handed in on or before Monday, December 6, 1999.  They will be discussed during the final week in class.

1.) (Up to 10% Extra Credit)

Using either your own computer or one in the Undergraduate Library, “visit” the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Home Energy Saver at: http://hes.lbl.gov/.  Working with the programs you find there (and with other linked sites, if you so desire-explore the web!) estimate the energy and monetary costs of your home, as it is, this year.  Then, make some reasonable changes in your home and see how much energy and money you can save.  Can/will you really make these changes?  Why or why not?

2.) (up to 10% Extra Credit)

Using the library and/or the Web, estimate your current annual energy and monetary costs of commuting to school.  Then suggest some alternative reasonable commuting models and estimate how much energy and money you can save.  Can/will you really make these changes?  Why or why not?
 

3.) (Up to 10% Extra Credit)

a.) Estimate, as accurately as you reasonably can, the total amount of energy, (other than home and school), you will use as an individual, directly and indirectly, this year.
b.) On this basis, make an estimate of the impact you will make on the present and future environment.
c.) What other, non-energy impacts will you have?
d.) What changes can you reasonably make in your life style to significantly diminish your impact upon the environment?  Estimate, numerically, how much less energy use would be attributed to you.
e.) What are the chances-and why-that you can/will actually carry out these changes?

4.) (Up to 10% Extra Credit)

Using data taken from the roof of Wayne's Physics Building ( see http://hal.physics.wayne.edu  ), estimate the total amount of solar energy falling on the puilding in any one day.  What fraction of the estimated cooling or heating requirements of the building would this solar energy supply? Discuss the reasonableness of your assumptions and results.